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Resigning Gracefully

Banking, Accounting, & Finance

You have just accepted a wonderful new position and have called your friends and family to share the good news.  Before letting your close friends know at your current company, it is best to formally resign.  By professionally resigning, your supervisor won’t inadvertently hear about it “through the grapevine”.

To make the process go smoothly, it is suggested to have a typed resignation letter to hand to your supervisor during your meeting.  Informing your current employer of your resignation takes tact and discretion.  Keep it simple and not personal.

If you are not ready to share the name of your new employer, it is best to tell them that you cannot disclose that information until your new employer announces it within your own organization.

Some general suggestions for the resignation process are:

  • Have a last date in mind. Offer the traditional two weeks notice, recognizing there are circumstances where a longer notice is appropriate. It is not a good idea to offer your notice and then go on vacation for the duration of the notice as this would not provide for a smooth transition.
  • Give notice in person unless the logistics make it impossible to do so.
  • Offer to train your replacement if the time frame makes sense and to assist in any way possible during the transition. Include specific suggestions.
  • If time allows, prepare a reference document of your daily procedures. It is helpful to include frequently called phone numbers and contact names for your replacement.
  • Remember to thank your supervisor for your current opportunity. Mention any specific learning that you have appreciated.
  • Ask if there are any suggestions your supervisor may have for you as you move on to your next position that you could learn from.
  • Ask for a letter of reference.

Manufacturing

You have just accepted a wonderful new position and have called your friends and family to share the good news.  Before letting your close friends know at your current company, it is best to formally resign.  By professionally resigning, your supervisor won’t inadvertently hear about it “through the grapevine”.

To make the process go smoothly, it is suggested to have a typed resignation letter to hand to your supervisor during your meeting.  Informing your current employer of your resignation takes tact and discretion.  Keep it simple and not personal.

If you are not ready to share the name of your new employer, it is best to tell them that you cannot disclose that information until your new employer announces it within your own organization.

Some general suggestions for the resignation process are:

  • Have a last date in mind. Offer the traditional two weeks notice, recognizing there are circumstances where a longer notice is appropriate. It is not a good idea to offer your notice and then go on vacation for the duration of the notice as this would not provide for a smooth transition.
  • Give notice in person unless the logistics make it impossible to do so.
  • Offer to train your replacement if the time frame makes sense and to assist in any way possible during the transition. Include specific suggestions.
  • If time allows, prepare a reference document of your daily procedures. It is helpful to include frequently called phone numbers and contact names for your replacement.
  • Remember to thank your supervisor for your current opportunity. Mention any specific learning that you have appreciated.
  • Ask if there are any suggestions your supervisor may have for you as you move on to your next position that you could learn from.
  • Ask for a letter of reference.

Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Medical Devices, & Diagnostics

You have just accepted a wonderful new position and have called your friends and family to share the good news.  Before letting your close friends know at your current company, it is best to formally resign.  By professionally resigning, your supervisor won’t inadvertently hear about it “through the grapevine”.

To make the process go smoothly, it is suggested to have a typed resignation letter to hand to your supervisor during your meeting.  Informing your current employer of your resignation takes tact and discretion.  Keep it simple and not personal.

If you are not ready to share the name of your new employer, it is best to tell them that you cannot disclose that information until your new employer announces it within your own organization.

Some general suggestions for the resignation process are:

  • Have a last date in mind. Offer the traditional two weeks notice, recognizing there are circumstances where a longer notice is appropriate. It is not a good idea to offer your notice and then go on vacation for the duration of the notice as this would not provide for a smooth transition.
  • Give notice in person unless the logistics make it impossible to do so.
  • Offer to train your replacement if the time frame makes sense and to assist in any way possible during the transition. Include specific suggestions.
  • If time allows, prepare a reference document of your daily procedures. It is helpful to include frequently called phone numbers and contact names for your replacement.
  • Remember to thank your supervisor for your current opportunity. Mention any specific learning that you have appreciated.
  • Ask if there are any suggestions your supervisor may have for you as you move on to your next position that you could learn from.
  • Ask for a letter of reference.

Talent Acquistion & Contract Staffing for the Tri-State Area

You have just accepted a wonderful new position and have called your friends and family to share the good news.  Before letting your close friends know at your current company, it is best to formally resign.  By professionally resigning, your supervisor won’t inadvertently hear about it “through the grapevine”.

To make the process go smoothly, it is suggested to have a typed resignation letter to hand to your supervisor during your meeting.  Informing your current employer of your resignation takes tact and discretion.  Keep it simple and not personal.

If you are not ready to share the name of your new employer, it is best to tell them that you cannot disclose that information until your new employer announces it within your own organization.

Some general suggestions for the resignation process are:

  • Have a last date in mind. Offer the traditional two weeks notice, recognizing there are circumstances where a longer notice is appropriate. It is not a good idea to offer your notice and then go on vacation for the duration of the notice as this would not provide for a smooth transition.
  • Give notice in person unless the logistics make it impossible to do so.
  • Offer to train your replacement if the time frame makes sense and to assist in any way possible during the transition. Include specific suggestions.
  • If time allows, prepare a reference document of your daily procedures. It is helpful to include frequently called phone numbers and contact names for your replacement.
  • Remember to thank your supervisor for your current opportunity. Mention any specific learning that you have appreciated.
  • Ask if there are any suggestions your supervisor may have for you as you move on to your next position that you could learn from.
  • Ask for a letter of reference.
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